Here are my thoughts on sitting the British “A-Levels” in Australia as a possible path to University Entrance for Home Educated students.

Disclaimer :  This is a guide only – our current plan which we have not yet verified/ completed – so please check for yourself before making any decisions.

Questions :

  • What are A-Levels ?
  • Why do them ?
  • How to do them ?
  • Costs / Logistics ?
  • Does it really work ?

In a nutshell, the A-levels are the UK / British approximate equivalent of the Australian VCE/HSC/ATAR, or the American CollegeBoard/AP exams, or the IB International Baccalaureate.  That is to say, they are the highest secondary school qualification, and are used to gain entrance to University and satisfy tertiary prerequisites.

A-levels are sat in many international schools worldwide, and are quite well known by universities in many countries, so the qualification is reasonably well regarded and can usually be compared/converted to the local equivalent.  The exams are standalone and not based on coursework, they are marked by an independent body and have few formal prerequisites or formal age requirements.   There are plenty of course materials, books and past exam questions available, and A levels cover a wide range of subjects in depth.

In Australia, the BritishCouncil in Sydney run the exams in May/Jun and Oct/Nov, and some in Jan.  There are various exam “boards” which set the exams and mark them, and BritishCouncil offer the option of EdExcel or CIE ‘flavor’ exams.

In our case, DS15 – code for ‘my 15 year old Darling Son’ – has worked a couple of years ahead in Math, using materials from KhanAcademy.org, AoPS.com and amt.edu.au.    Doing some fairly rigorous academic tests in Math next year seems a good fit, in preparation for University the following year.   If we could have done VCE methods, ‘spesh’ and physics next year that would have worked out fine – but we could not find a school that would allow us this flexibility.

In the UK it is normal to sit 3 A-levels, so our plan for 2019 is roughly :

  • “Maths” in May/Jun
  • “Further Maths” in Oct/Nov
  • “Physics” in Oct/Nov

I think this gives us a reasonable chance of getting into a good science/math program at an Australian university, but they may insist he also sit an entrance STAT exam to show evidence of English / Reasoning / Writing skills at university level.

The A level exams are not super cheap – each test is around $300 AUD, with usually 2 or 3 tests per subject on different days, so around $2400 in our case.  There is also the issue of travel and accommodation to sit the tests in Sydney and lesser costs for books and materials.  There are some online distance ed providers for A levels, but in our case we prefer to self study from the books.

If things go well, we will report back on our success and this pathway might prove useful for other home educated students.  If things don’t go well, we can review what went wrong, and DS will still have time to find other pathways to get into Uni.   I admit this is a pretty “geeky” approach with so much emphasis on Maths, but it suits us well and DS does have wider interests – he plays the violin, reads voraciously, writes, does computer art and programming, loves cooking etc.   Even with good marks in A-levels a 16yo student will most likely need the University Dean of Schools approval, so we shall see what they say about our best-of-british quals !

Some links :